MORNING PEOPLE

I am absolutely a morning person.

I have been like this for a long time, I say it’s because of how early I had to wake up for primary school/middle school/high school. Also college had early classes, and I have a Bachelor of Science degree in educational studies, so I had to relive the whole getting-up-early thing from primary school but this time I was in the teaching role so I had to get up even earlier.

I don’t know if that made me a morning person or not, but I truly enjoy it.

According to my research on a government website, I discovered that morning/evening people are likely predisposed from their genes. Also, studies have shown that this is a heritable trait. If y’all want to read the whole webpage, go to:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4876263/

As I mentioned above, I’m absolutely a morning person, and although it can annoy those around me when I am ready to start the day at 07:00, I will let my body perform how it does best—in the morning! Have a wonderful day and thanks for reading.

Why did I get a college degree? The reason may shock you.

So yes, I’m a college graduate with a BS in education. I am the first person in my family history to graduate college too, which is awesome for future generations. But why did I want to get a degree? The reason may shock you.

My mom always told me and my younger brothers that we were going to go to college. It wasn’t a free ride though as my parents didn’t have oodles of extra money to send us to college. In other words, I had to take out loans and apply for scholarships to pay for it. Yes it was expensive but I think it was worth it.

I went to two different colleges and graduated from the second one. It is called Cabrini University. The education taught there was way less stressful and I decided to get a degree for myself instead of doing it just because my parents wanted me to. Doing it for myself felt more gratifying.

I should back up quite a bit though, my reason started in May of 2009 when I was eleven years old. I was in an almost fatal car accident while trying to show a new friend around town. I wanted her to move to my town so I could see her more often and I guess I wanted to familiarize her with the town in case she moved there. Thank goodness she wasn’t also hit by the distracted driver of a Ford F-150, thank goodness. I don’t talk to her anymore, but she is often in my thoughts.

I was tossed over 50 feet upon impact. We were crossing the street on a crosswalk that is very close to a fire station, so I got help quickly. I was airlifted to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. My parents were notified at some point.

The prognosis I was given was very bleak. I was in a semiconscious vegetative state for a good deal of my stay. I suffered multiple broken bones, a traumatic brain injury, and additional vision loss on top of already being visually impaired at birth. The doctors told my parents that I would never walk, talk, or be able to function independently. At some point I wasn’t vegetative anymore and I insisted on walking out of the hospital to prove the doctors and statistics wrong, which I did.

I apologize for not going too in depth about the accident, but that is only the context for my reasoning. Now that that’s out of the way, I will get to the point. I wanted to be a veterinarian when I was a child, but I decided against it when thinking realistically (I don’t want to preform a life or death operation wrong on someone’s beloved pet) so I went to college for educational studies. I did it if only to prove the doctors wrong yet again and defy statistics. Is that a good reason to get a college degree? That is up to your interpretation. I graduated from Cabrini University in 2020, and I betrayed the statistical outcome.